ABOUT THIS BLOG

"A Faithful Attempt" is designed to showcase a variety of K-12 art lessons, the work of my art students, as well as other art-related topics. Projects shown are my take on other art teacher's lessons, lessons found in books or else designed by myself.
Thanks for visiting!



Monday, June 12, 2017

Ombre Watercolour Maple Leaves


This was the final project in a watercolour unit I teach my Junior High students.
Their first project used liquid watercolours, then they used the watercolours in a pan and they ended with watercolour pencils.

The inspiration for this project was the logo for Canada's 150th anniversary of Confederation.
It was created by Ariana Cuvin from Toronto, Ontario. The logo is composed of a series of diamonds, or “celebratory gems”, arranged in the shape of the iconic maple leaf. The four diamonds at the base represent the four original provinces that formed Confederation in 1867: Ontario, Quebec, New Brunswick and Nova Scotia. Additional diamonds extend out from the base to create nine more points—in total representing the 13 provinces and territories. (Source)


For our project, I used a classpack of Crayola watercolour pencils.
They work really well.


Students first drew a maple leaf. Then, using a ruler, they 'fractured' it into many different sections.
I demonstrated how to create an ombre effect using the pencils.
The hardest part, by far, was drawing the maple leaf! haha!



Grade 7 - 9 results:








































Wednesday, June 7, 2017

Canada 150 Whole School Maple Leaf & Tree Display


2017 is a big year for Canada as a country: this year marks 150 years since Confederation.
Cities across Canada will be having extra special events on Canada Day which takes place every year on July 1st.

I helped make this commemorative tree in the entryway of our school. All students from K-12 were involved in creating the leaves. I modified the logo to allow for more space for students to write and photocopied one for each student and staff. They were asked to decorate each leaf and to write on it something to the effect of: 
- why they are proud to be Canadian 
or
- what it means to be Canadian

The Kindergarten students (well, their teachers, haha) wrote down interesting Canadian facts. Did you know we consume the most mac & cheese in the world! 
I am definitely a contributor to that! 





The logo was designed by Ariana Cuvin, a 19-year old digital arts student from Toronto- she won a nation-wide competition. The logo is composed of a series of diamonds, or “celebratory gems”, arranged in the shape of the iconic maple leaf. The four diamonds at the base represent the four original provinces that formed Confederation in 1867: Ontario, Quebec, New Brunswick and Nova Scotia. Additional diamonds extend out from the base to create nine more points—in total representing the 13 provinces and territories.

As you can see below, I started off with a very sad looking bare branched tree. I glued two sheets of brown bulletin board paper together and drew a tree on it. After cutting it out (what a pain), I painted it using tempera. I (and when I say 'I', I mean my students, haha) then stuck it to the glass wall we have in our school entryway using loops of scotch tape on the back. As the finished maple leaves started trickling in, my students and I taped them to the tree.


Have a read at what some of our students wrote on their leaves below:











Sunday, May 28, 2017

Circle Grid Trees


This is a wonderful lesson to teach towards the end of a school year. It's fun, it's colourful and it's summery. But, it also takes quite a bit of focus and patience; a perfect art project for when the kids (and teacher!) are getting antsy for summer vacation. I've definitely noticed all of my classes starting to get louder, more hyper, so this is the time of the year when I pick my lessons very carefully in order to create a sense of calmness in the Art Studio.

This circle grid tree lesson is all over Pinterest, but I followed the excellent lesson found on the wonderful art website "Art Projects for Kids". Thank you as always Kathy!

I printed off the grid template onto regular photocopy paper. You could also print it onto cardstock if you want to paint these (I've yet to figure out how to manually feed cardstock into our complicated school photocopier!!)
I made two sizes: regular 81/2 x 11" small paper for the slower students and 
then blew it up to 11 x 17 for the faster students. 

I taught this lesson to a mixed Grade class: Grades 4 - 6.
First they sketch out their tree in pencil; many included patterns.


Then some started by outlining their trees in black, brown, etc. Then they used either cool or warm colours to colour their tree, then the opposite for their background. I gave them the option of using markers or coloured pencils. Younger students could also use wax crayons.



Highlighters are also great to colour with!


This project took a surprisingly long time- at least 4- 40 minute lessons to complete.

Some of the Grade 4 - 6 results:























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